Creative Commons Image wins Italian Court Case

The contested photo of Federico Rampini at the Auditorium Santa Chiara in Trento for the Festival of Economics. CC-BY-SA 4.0

The contested photo of Niccolo Rampini at the Auditorium Santa Chiara in Trento for the Festival of Economics. By N. Caranti, 2015 CC-BY-SA 4.0

A Creative Commons photo licensed under a CC-by-SA-4.0 licence by professional photographer Federico Caranti has won a court case against the photograph’s misuse (shown left) . Last year the Festival delle Resistenze in Trentino-Alto Adige used Caranti’s photo but failed to attribute the image or release it under the same CC licence as stipulated by the licence conditions. More information about this case can be read here.

 

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Madonna Wins Vogue Copyright Court Case

Madonna

Madonna, reproduced under CC Licence (CC BY-SA 2.0), taken by Jason H Smith, 2010.

The US Court of Appeal has ruled that Madonna’s Vogue did not infringe US copyright law by using a sample of a horn from another track which lasted for less than a second.  The sound of the horn was allegedly lifted from the Salsoul Orchestra track ‘Love Break’ and is difficult to identify without careful attention.

More information on this story can be found on the BBC’s webpage.

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New online course for University Lecturers

Are you a new lecturer or would you like to understand more about copyright in relation to your teaching? Jisc has produced a useful, online copyright course full of videos, scenarios, animations and includes a quiz at the end.

‘Copyright Training for University Lecturers’ can be seen running here http://mitchellmedia.co.uk/jisclegal/ctul/  if you want to try it before download it. Otherwise it can be downloaded from here – http://find.jorum.ac.uk/resources/10949/19261.

 

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It’s illegal in the UK to copy music again

You’re probably not aware, but copying music CDs onto your computer, or making copies of your digital music files, is now illegal under UK law.

Earlier in the year a High Court decision overturned legislative changes that made it legal to copy CDs or download tracks from iTunes, and despite the Government’s efforts they have failed to overturn the decision.

Click here for more information.

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Student’s Guide to Copyright

Are you a student and struggling with copyright? Or simply confused with the changes to copyright law?  Then check out this new guide produced by Jisc which will help you to understand how to protect your own work whilst reusing other people’s work legally.  The guide not only explains the relevance of copyright during your studies but also how this knowledge can be applied in the workplace.

If you are simply looking for images, sound or video to re-use without fear of copyright infringement, then look for material licensed with a Creative Commons (CC) Licence.  One of the best places to start your search is on the Creative Commons Search webpage at this link. There are six different levels of CC licence.  To find out what you can do with the image/sound/video that you have chosen then click on ‘Some Rights Reserved’ as shown below in the screen shot (click image to make screen shot larger). This will take you to the licence page for that particular image etc and will explain how it can be reused.

Adapted ‘Victoria Sponge Cake’ by Kelly Hunter 2013, Reproduced under CC Licence (CC BY 2.0). https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Monkey Business

Money with a Camera taken by Ross Websdale, 2009 (CC BY NC-SA 2.0)

‘Money with a Camera’ taken by Ross Websdale, 2009 (CC BY NC-SA 2.0)

A photograph of a monkey or monkey selfie is at the centre of an international row over copyright authorship and ownership. British wildlife photographer David Slater, visited the Indonesian island of Sulawesi in 2011 to photograph crested macaque monkeys on a reserve.  After spending time setting up his equipment and gaining the monkey’s trust he managed to get the monkey to press a cable release switch which took a photograph of the monkey.

Wikipedia has since used the monkey selfie on their website claiming that it is a public domain image, however, David Slater says that the copyright should be his.  In the UK, the law states that copyright only exists in material created by humans and as the monkey pressed the camera’s shutter, the image cannot be protected by copyright.  This is a very interesting case as Slater obviously invested considerable time and effort in order to obtain this image.  Furthermore PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) have filed a lawsuit insiting that all proceeds from the sale of the monkey selfie should benefit the monkey,  who they have identified as being six -year-old Naruto.

To read more about this case click here.

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Happy Birthday song

A US judge has told the company collecting royalties to “Happy Birthday to You” that it does not a valid copyright to the song.

The tune was composed by two Kentucky sisters in 1893, who called their version, Good Morning To All, which later evolved into version that is now sung at birthday parties around the globe. The copyright was acquired by Warner/Chappell in 1988.

The judge has ruled that the original copyright was only granted for the song, not for the arrangements of the music. It will be interesting to see how this all plays out!

For more information click on this link.

 

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New resource on copyright issues

A copyright evidence Wiki has been set up by CREATE at the University of Glasgow. It brings together hundreds of studies on copyright issues grouped by theme and is being offered as a form of ‘dynamic literature review’.  The developers say it ‘intends to establish a body of evidence that allows better navigation in a contested policy field. Competing claims can be assessed and challenged transparently if the underlying data and methods are revealed’. The resource is available at: http://copyrightevidence.org.

 

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