Creative Commons (CC) Licences

Creative Commons (see: https://creativecommons.org/) is an organization which has developed a set of standard copyright licences. Owners of the copyright in works can use these licences to make the works available for members of the public to reuse free-of-charge, with more or less restriction on the extent and nature of their reuse. Creative Commons (CC) licences are normally used to license the reuse of works made available on the internet. In general CC-licensed works are easy to reuse: but of course you must read and abide by the terms of the licences that accompany them.

There are six different CC licences.  The following summaries are only indicative: for the exact terms of each licence you should follow the hyperlinks provided (see also: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/).

Licence You may: You may not: You must:
Attribution
(CC BY)
copy, alter, build upon and distribute the work – even for commercial* purposes. give a correct reference for the work; provide a hyperlink to the licence.
Attribution-ShareAlike
(CC BY-SA)
copy, alter, build upon and distribute the work – even for commercial* purposes. give a correct reference for the work; provide a hyperlink to the licence; issue your new version of the work under a CC BY-SA licence too.
Attribution-NoDerivatives
(CC BY-ND)
copy and distribute the work – even for commercial* purposes. alter the work at all. give a correct reference for the work; provide a hyperlink to the licence.
Attribution-NonCommercial
(CC BY-NC)
copy, alter, build upon and distribute the work – but only for non-commercial purposes. reuse the work for commercial* purposes. give a correct reference for the work; provide a hyperlink to the licence.
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
(CC BY-NC-SA)
copy, alter, build upon and distribute the work – but only for non-commercial purposes. reuse the work for commercial* purposes. give a correct reference for the work; provide a hyperlink to the licence; issue your new version of the work under a CC BY-NC-SA licence too.
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives
(CC BY-NC-ND)
copy and distribute the work – but only for non-commercial purposes. alter the work at all; reuse the work for commercial* purposes. give a correct reference for the work; provide a hyperlink to the licence.
* “primarily intended for or directed towards commercial advantage or monetary compensation”.

Finding Creative Commons-licensed material.

For other sources of copyright-friendly material see: http://copyright.lboro.ac.uk/copyright/sourcing-images/.

Reusing Creative Commons-licensed material.  Figure 1 is an example of this.  The material is a diagram from a Creative Commons-licensed Open Access journal.  As well as a citation, you should give a copyright statement (“© IJAET 2013”) and a licensing statement, including a hyperlink to the licence itself (“issued under a Creative Commons licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/)”).

CC_1

Figure 1: ‘General composite arrangement’, taken from Prajapati, B.D., and Panchal, D.R., 2013, p. 1837. © IJAET 2013, issued under a Creative Commons licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

(The full reference is: Prajapati, B.D., and Panchal, D.R., 2013. ‘Study of seismic and wind effect on multi-storey RCC, steel and composite building’. International Journal of Advances in Engineering and Technology [online], 6 (4), 1836-1847. URL: http://www.e-ijaet.org/media/45I16-IJAET0916895_v6_iss4_1836to1847.pdf.)

Creative Commons has created a webpage on Best Practices for Attribution at this link.

Public Domain Dedication (CC0).  Creative Commons has also drawn up a document which allows the owner of the copyright in a work to waive his/her copyright and thus to place the work in the Public Domain before the copyright expires.  There is practically no restriction on what anybody may do with such a work.  For more information, see: http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/legalcode.

Last updated 28/7/16 C Greasley

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